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Shaves and trims

11 Oct

I have to say if it should ever come about that I can’t shave myself (not that I ever do)  or trim my own beard (again only rarely) you can take me out and shoot me. I am, perhaps, not the barber’s best friend. Anyhoo this cute little sign aimed at a somewhat younger (and richer) clientèle than myself is on the way home from Hull Fair on Chanterlands Avenue.
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Trinity Market

19 Sep

The indoor market has had a large loss of customers and was a pretty depressing empty place. So it is having a rebrand with new designed stalls and new signage but in the end its just a market and if folk don’t come then it’ll be a closed market.

The Masters Bar

17 Sep

At the junction of Jameson Street and South Street stands this little gem of Edwardian baroque revival. It was built in 1903 and is, of course, protected by a Grade 2 listing.
I’ll mention  here (without comment) an odd little poster that you may have noticed in the top photo. It’s for that Larkin exhibition at the University which I posted about a few weeks ago.

Omne solum forti patria …

12 Sep

Omne solum forti patria est ut piscibus aequor, 
ut volucri vacuo quicquid in orbe patet
Hull being the cultured place that it is it should come as no surprise to find Ovid quoted on the corner of Hessle Road and the Boulevard. 

"A handsome and spacious new establishment"

11 Sep

Mr Craft and his company it appeared had designs to have stores on the main roads into Hull. Starting in the mid 1880s with Beverley Road by 1912 they had one on Witham and one on Anlaby Road and by 1914 would have had one on Hessle Road had not an Archduke and his wife taken a wrong turn in Sarajevo. So anyhow Crafts’ Ltd proudly opened their Hessle Road store in May 1919. The local paper, the Hull Daily Mail, was there and gave it a big write up. We are given a description of this “innovation for Hessle Road” that reads like an architectural review: “As one approaches the new premises, the impression is of an effectively designed building, of lofty proportions, with distinct architectural features. The design suggests a modern business establishment on the lines of the great London stores. The fabric is a Royal Doulton terracotta facade with alternate squares and graceful circular columns. On the ground floor are two large semi-island windows and two large side windows. The building is surmounted with an imposing dome.” I’m guessing this was cut and pasted or whatever was the style in those days from a Crafts’ Ltd press release. The ground floor we are told sold “goods in the carpet line, dress and cotton fabrics, gentlemen’s outfitting goods, boots, etc.. The first floor we are informed “”will be of great interest to the ladies, for here are to be found the most modern underclothing, baby linen, smart blouses and the latest fashionable hats, effectively displayed at prices which appear to be most reasonable.” It ends optimistically: “It is safe to say that Messrs Craft’s new stores… will be quickly appreciated.”…
Maybe the stores were appreciated I don’t know. I can say that today there are no Crafts’ stores in Hull. I can find no reference to what happened to these dreams stores, maybe the downturn in the 20s and 30s was too much, or maybe they spent too much on terracotta columns and imposing domes (which, by the way, seems to have disappeared). The handsome and spacious establishment now sells camping equipment and outdoor clothing: The store website informs us: “You’ll find everything from jackets, fleeces, t-shirts, trousers and shorts, hoodies, base layers (???) and workwear .” Maybe they should get the HDM to do them a write up.

New uses and abuses

10 Sep

On Spring Bank, the former waiting room for hell has been transformed into an ice cream parlour. I appreciate the grey and red decor and am glad that a good use has been found for this building. 

I do however have a slight concern about what this sign could possibly mean … surely not.

The Half Way, Hessle Road

27 Aug

That’s half way between Hessle and Hull. As a crow flies it’s about four and a half miles from the centre of old town Hull to Hessle’s bustling heart so maybe it’s five or so miles on the ground.  A fair walk but hardly exhausting. Nevertheless you’d need some refreshment if going to either destination, and if overcome by dread or fatigue you could rest up at the Half Way Hotel.  This place, by the look of it built in the first half of the 19th century when Hessle Road was a turnpike and ran through open fields, is no longer a hotel but still refreshes so I’m told. The large mural I showed the other day is on the far side.