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A tale of two towers

21 Apr

I’m keeping out of the city of culture for a few days; they have taken to dancing in an old graveyard while stuffing their faces all the name of culture and it’s not a pretty sight. So I return to Bridlington Priory and its two odd towers. It’s looks on the face of it like it’s the real deal; an old Gothic building with a perpendicular tower. Well partly. The church as it stands is the vestige of Bridlington monastery which would have looked a bit like this in the early 16th century. As you all know if you were still awake in history classes the monasteries in England were dissolved by HenryVIII. Now the Prior of this place decided to take part in the Pilgrimage of Grace, a rising in Yorkshire against Henry VIII which did not end well. The monastery quickly lost all its valuables and gradually fell into disrepair until only the nave remained standing and that in no good condition.  The pictures below show it in 1786 and 1842. Note there are no towers by the front entrance. So enter our old friend and saviour of fallen churches Sir Gilbert Scott and his passion for the Gothic revival and up rises one perpendicular Gothic tower in the 1870’s and one stump of a tower as a permanent reminder not to trust planners …

The rear view, those buttresses are all Victorian.

I came across this helpful little site on my travels

Tangled up in blue

25 Dec

Over in Trinity Square the finishing touches to this year’s marathon makeover were being put in place the other day. I noticed this figure wrapped in blue plastic. It’s the reinstated statue of Andrew Marvell. This seems to be a more modest presentation as previously he was atop four or five steps and surrounded by four concrete balls. Naturally those steps were the place for alkies and druggies to while the day away. Where will they go now, those poor souls?

And jumping over to the other side of town to the junction of King Edward Street and Jameson Street this was the scene late on Wednesday still with a rush to complete by Christmas Eve. Still with the old orange barriers and still a fair few paving blocks to be laid. I haven’t been back since then but the local paper reports that Jameson Street, off to the left, is now clear of barriers though the response from readers seems somewhat mixed.

And as ever a job is not done until it has been seen to be done by at least five other workers …

If you’ve reached this far it only remains for me to wish you all a “Happy Whatever It Is You May Be Celebrating” this exceedingly mild December 25 …

Smile, damn you

7 Oct

I was going to say that today, unlike yesterday, is poets day but then I find that October 7 is Happy World Smile Day! Spread that Joy so it comes back and hits you in the gob.

The weekend in black and white is (thankfully) smiling at us from here.

Meet the Burtons

25 May
Richard Burton

Due to events that need not concern you I was forced yesterday afternoon to stay in Cottingham for three hours. Now Cottingham has a few attractions but not, even on a good day, three hours worth. And yesterday it was cold and raining heavily, yes I know it’s May. So seeking shelter from the elements I ended up in St Mary’s church, camera in hand and acres of time to fill. The place was, as usual empty with only the vicar’s CCTV cameras keeping me company. Anyway enough of my troubles ..
Tucked away by the entrance are three large (ridiculously large) memorials to various Burtons the people who owned most of Cottignham in the 18th century and indeed lots of east Yorkshire as well. The most notable, if you are into military-history things that is, is the one above to Richard Burton a commander of the British army in North America. He was lieutenant governor of Quebec and then governor of Three Rivers Province back in 1760s or thereabouts. Below are two more memorials to William and Robert Burton who as far as I can tell did little other than have great wealth and do whatever it is wealthy people do. I did not notice any memorial to Napier Christie Burton who seemed to manage to live beyond even the Burton family’s means and ended up selling the holdings in Cottingham, even at one stage going to debtors prison. Somehow I couldn’t find anything to him, strange that…

Robert Burton

William Burton

Sign of the cross

12 Oct

This is a new display on St Columba’s on Holderness Road. Somehow I doubt any amount of new signage is going to get the punters into church although I grant it does have high brand recognition.

By schisms rent asunder

20 Apr

First of all I admit to coming here once again with half a story. I don’t know what the intentions are regarding the recently burnt out Methodist chapel on Lambert Street. What I can say is that the triangular pediment that looked like it might tumble down at any moment has gone, also the top storey on one side. But most of the front, back and one side look, to my untrained eye, to be solid; so there might some hope of salvaging something out of all this. However the building is still in the hands of  “East Yorkshire’s experts in demolition” so we’ll just have to wait and see. As I said, half a story, if that.

See how great a flame aspires …

15 Apr

Kindled by a spark of grace!
I could not say that I was entirely surprised to learn yesterday morning that the George Lamb Memorial Chapel on Lambert Street had been destroyed by fire. As I mentioned in my post three years ago it had been in a fairly derelict state for years and last used for God bothering 21 years ago. Other long empty buildings have been subject to similar blazes in the recent past. 
I’d heard rumours the Council were going to buy it under the compulsory purchase system but I don’t know if anything came of that. Anyhow that’s all a bit moot at the moment. The innards are completely gone and engineers are testing the structural viability of the shell. Let’s hope the facade is sound enough to be saved at least though it does look a bit iffy to be honest. There is, of course, plenty of scuttlebutt about how convenient this destruction might be for any potential developer, I couldn’t possibly comment.