Archive | July, 2010

Red and Green should never be seen ….

31 Jul

This is the ceiling of Holy Trinity Church, Hull. At one time all the church would have been as brightly coloured and painted. It was the Reformation and the puritans who had no colour sense that lead to plain  interiors. How the stain glass survived the siege of Hull and the bombs of Hitler I don’t know.
 
This months theme day topic is bright colours. Click here to view thumbnails for all participants

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Spurned

31 Jul
This is the light of the old Spurn Point lightship, now moored up and a tourist attraction at the Marina.

Marvell of Hull

29 Jul
Andrew Marvell, MP and poet, is here positioned in front of his old school in Trinity Square. The building is now the Hands on History Museum which had we but world enough, and time, is still not worth the effort of going round.
 In 1921 Hull celebrated the tercentenary of Andrew Marvell’s birth with city-wide events; I wonder if they went to the same lengths as today’s motley crew with the Larkinalia. Were the streets filled with gaudily painted coy mistresses? Sadly my information on this is lacking.

Old ferry pierhead

28 Jul
Before the Humber bridge was built ferries ran from here to New Holland on the Lincolnshire side of the Humber. In those days there was a proper Corporation Pier  but that’s all long gone. The last surviving ferry, the PS Lincoln Castle, is currently being broken up in a Grimsby dock. Humber pilots used to board from the pier but I don’t think they still do.
The other side of the pier has a ramp known locally as the ‘oss wash, a place for cleaning horses.
In the background looms the iconic Deep.

Arc-boutant

27 Jul
Arcs-boutants also known as a flying buttresses; these devices transmit the force of the ceiling through the wall to a counterweight outside the building. It means the walls can be thinner and allows more space inside the building. They were extensively used in mediaeval ecclesiastical buildings. However the ones you see here, at St Mary’s, Beverley, were put up in the 1850s in a restoration job by Augustus Welby Pugin, his son E Welby Pugin, and Sir Gilbert Scott.
They fit in well and do look pretty cool with the light shining through. 

A white pair

26 Jul
No visit to the park would be complete without some ducks in a pond. These are the whitest ducks I’ve ever seen.

Menagerie Collage

25 Jul
When East Park was renovated they built an animal compound with a large walk-through aviary to replace an older more ramshackle affair. There’s a motley collection of animals, birds and fishes though the deer that used to be in the park seem to have gone.